Pappu will only pass if he goes to school

 

I loved school. Once I actually pulled the exact opposite of what’s known broadly today as a ‘’sicky’’ and pretended to my parents that I was well enough to attend. My infected insides attempted to reach out in every way possible to expose the lie, mostly through snot and sneezes. I sincerely doubt the reasoning behind the betrayal was an early, deep-set appreciation for the grounding framework that education would provide me in years to come; I expect I just had an undeveloped 90s version of TFOMO (the fear of missing out). It was ‘’Victorian day’’.

But of course, this younger and (only slightly more) self righteous version of me had a point. Education was a vitally important contributor towards the development of the well rounded, volatile person I am today. Not just for providing me with the obligatory academic knowledge I needed, but for a whole understanding of the world and people I would never have been exposed to otherwise.

Despite this, many people still question the validity and effectiveness in education. In some parts of the world, education is believed to be too too expensive for the rewards you will ultimately benefit. In developing nations such as India, many children miss out on elementary education altogether due to their socio-economic backgrounds. Initiatives have now been set up across the country, such as Street to school in Kolkata, which provides funding that goes towards helping slum children have access the vital elementary education.

This is not the only reason children do not attend school. A poverty stricken family would rather trade their child’s education in favour of work to help earn a family income. Often, children are abandoned and not provided with the practical means to attend school. This could be travel, stationary or uniform. In colder regions, organisations such as Aasra Trust provide winter uniforms to help prevent children wanting to drop out of school.

Some who have been born in extenuating circumstances, such as children of women who have brothel-based mothers, need extensive development support in order for them to grow physically, cognitively, socially and emotionally before they can even consider formal schooling. The charity Apne Aap Women’s Collective provides day and night care for 2.5 years to 5 year olds for children such as this.

Disability is also a huge factor in this. Children born with mental or physical impairments face huge marginalisation in school and are 70% more vulnerable. Charities such as Samadhan focuses on differently abled children , for those with cerebral palsy, autism or mental difficulties. This enables them to access education which previously wasn’t possible.

Of course, there are also organisations such as SETU, which supports all aspects of the education process, providing complete education for 294 children including all basic means such as text books, note books and stationery, uniform and mid-day meals.

I’ve written quick list here on why education is so fundamental in developing a child. Knowledge

  1. Morality
  2. Social skills
  3. Creative thinking
  4. Diversity of thinking
  5. Confidence
  6. Independence
  7. Learn new cultures and languages
  8. Healthier lifestyle – promotes healthy eating and sports
  9. Economic growth of the nation
  10. Setting yourself up for the future